Welcome to M.E. BAILEY ART . . . .

Here you will find adventures in painting. . . . Victories, absolute defeats, frustrations, highs, lows, lessons learned, commentary and thoughts from me and other artists.

As an art instructor, I don't wish to hide the fact that I crash and burn often. I will always be learning. So, it all gets shown here . . .good and bad. Every painting we do counts in the learning and experience process. The failures actually are much better teachers than successes. Every piece made is a teacher. That's the fun of it: the challenge to learn.

SEARCH FOR A WORD IN THE BOX TO THE RIGHT: COLOR, VALUE, PERSPECTIVE, IDEAS, MUSE, PLEIN AIR. . .ETC . . . .YOU'LL FIND PLENTY OF PAINTINGS AND IDEAS AS A RESULT. hAVE FUN!

Join in and comment or email me, if you would like.


Tuesday, June 19, 2007

Color Harmonies

"Casino Dawn"
oil on canvas, 16" x 20"



Today's piece was a serious one. Not just practice, but one that I hope will be accepted into a museum show honoring the 100th anniversary of the "Boardwalk" . . .an amusement park here that boasts an old wooden rollercoaster . . . .and the site of several movies in the past.


I have been 'working on' this piece for over a ten days without ever lifting a brush. I mean it! Really! I looked at and sketched several points of view. Went to the site several times, but never in this lighting conditions. Then photographs were taken because there was no way I could paint from this angle without being squashed by a car or truck. It just wasn't possible. So I had to use a photo . . .something I almost NEVER do. (I shall save that commentary for another post.) Once the drawing was done, color harmony and value emphasis had to be reasoned through before I painted it. I wanted the feeling of dawn with golden light, while the streets are empty and I wanted the emphasis to be on the building with the dome . . .the casino, as it is called. . . . .or the Coconut Grove. Reasoning wasn't enough . . .I had to resort to a very abbreviated palette and force myself to stay in it so I could establish relationships between every single color in the piece. Cad Orange, Cad Yellow Medium, Violet, Cad Red Lite and Green and, of course white. Every brush load was a mix of at least two of these colors and most often of three to insure it would all relate. Frankly, as I worked through the painting, I was amazed at how many different colors I was able to arouse on my palette. Again, it seems I am gaining some ground in this new medium.

10 comments:

Brenis said...

ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS!!!!!!
You amaze me!!

Nava said...

THAT.
IS.
STUNNING!!!

And so rich with color, despite the limited palette.

Ed Terpening said...

Nice composition, Mike. I also like the way you were able to communicate distance (the background palms) with such a limited palette.

silvina said...

Wow! Those palms are fab!
Beach Boys meets James Bond.

Mike said...

Thanks everyone! The palette I chose amazed me too. Incidentally, the painting was accepted by the museum for the anniversary show.

silvina said...

Congratulations Mike!

Hank Z said...

Wonderful sense of the peaceful morning... Just lovely!

Nava said...

Cool - congrats!!

Evelyn said...

Nava just took the words right out of my mouth...this is really a stunner Mike. I can't wait to see it in person!

The subtleness of your palette is amazing. You had to really plan and engineer these harmonies! Very inspirational!

Mike said...

Actually, Ev, the simpler the palette, the easier it is to mix harmonic colors . . .they are all related that way . . .that is to say, just different mixes of the same colors . . .relatives of each other. No 'engineering' required.

Mike